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let the brain idle. "An idle mind is the devil's workshop." And the devil's name is Alzheimer's. 3. Enjoy the simple things, especially in food, which is best eaten at its most basic level. 4. Laugh often, long and loud. Laugh until you gasp for breath. 5. The tears happen. Endure, grieve, and move on. The only person, who is with us our entire life, is ourselves. Be ALIVE while you are alive. 6. Surround yourself with what you love, whether it's family, pets, keepsakes, music, plants, hobbies, whatever. Your home is your refuge. 7. Cherish your health: If it is good, preserve it. If it is unstable, improve it. If it is beyond what you can improve, get help. 8. Don't take guilt trips. Take a trip to the mall, even to the next county. Travel to a foreign country, but NOT to where the guilt is. 9. Tell the people you love that you love them, at every opportunity. 10. Start an exercise program. Make it easy at first and build on it as you feel appropriate. Keeping your body in shape will help you endure health issues should they arise. Always Remember... Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away. Look for opportunities to care about other people. Volunteer in a program that resonates with you. Tutor children in an after school program. Deliver meals to seniors who are shut ins. Making a difference in other people's lives will make a difference in your life too, a positive difference. Please share this with someone you care about. We all need to live life to its fullest each day.
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COVER FEATURE
Strong Senior Health The notion that seniors should expect their health to decline is nonsense, but it will unless we're proactive. Accepting declining health is a decision in the same way not accepting it is, and it's the effort we put forward that makes the difference between aging well and not. We've all noticed seniors who look decades older than their chronological age, and while some of that is genetic, much of it is due to the work we decide to do to remain young in body and heart. Some Numbers Do Matter Throw out nonessential numbers, specif- ically age. The numbers that matter relate to your height and weight being proportionate, blood sugar levels, and cholesterol. But state of mind also contributes to good health. Here are helpful tips for staying young at heart and in body. 1. Keep only cheerful friends. The grouches pull you down. 2. Keep learning. Learn more about the computer, crafts, gardening, whatever. Never